Wellness Wednesday: Give the Gift of Life

April is National Donate Life Month. It’s a month to celebrate those who have received transplants, to recognize those who continue to wait, to honor donors and donor families and to thank registered donors for giving hope.

30K-infographic1In 2015, organ transplants performed in the United States exceeded 30,000 for the first time annually. This incredible ‪‎milestone‬ is possible only because of donors and their families who make the generous decision to share life through donation.

Currently, over 118,000 men, women and children are awaiting organ transplants in the U.S. About 58% of patients awaiting transplants are minorities. Sadly, 8,000 people die each year22 people each day—because the organs they need are not donated in time.


Every 10 minutes another name is added to the nation’s organ transplant waiting list.


Who can donate?

NDLM-2017-InstagramAd_WebPeople of all ages and medical histories can be potential donors. Transplantation is one of the most remarkable success stories in the history of medicine. It offers patients a new chance at healthy, productive and normal lives and returns them to their families, friends and communities.

The vast majority of Americans support organ donation. However, many people overlook the important step of registering as a donor. Donors are often people who died suddenly and unexpectedly. Their families are then faced with making the decision at a time of shock and grief. Registering now relieves your family of this burden.

30K-infographic2More than 121 million people—approximately 51% of the U.S. adult population—are
registered organ, eye and tissue donors. Yet, the wait is still long for some patients. The average waiting time for a kidney from a deceased donor is 3 to 5 years.

Each year, approximately 30,000 people are registered as tissue donors and more than 1 million tissue transplants are performed; the surgical need for donated tissue is steadily rising. One tissue donor can help save more than 50 people.


Approximately 79 organ transplants take place every day in the United States.


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Wellness Wednesday: Give the Gift of Life

Did you know that more than 119,000 Americans are waiting for a life-saving organ transplant? One-third of those people will die before they even receive an organ.

NDLM-2017-InstagramAd_WebApril is National Donate Life Month. When you choose to become a donor, you are choosing to do your part to help others in need.

There are many myths and misconceptions about organ donation that keep individuals from registering to be a donor. Before you make your decision about becoming a donor, arm yourself with the truth. This information is from the Donate Life PA website:

MYTH: Doctors will not try to save my life if they know I am a registered organ donor.

TRUTH: Paramedics, doctors and nurses will do everything possible to save your life. The medical staff is completely separate from the transplant team. Transplant surgeons are called only after all efforts to save a life have been exhausted. Learn more about the donation process.

MYTH: I can only sign up to donate when getting/renewing my driver’s license, learner’s permit or photo ID.

TRUTH: You can sign up to be an organ donor at any time—and it only takes 30 seconds. Sign up now.

MYTH: My religion does not approve of donation.

TRUTH: Many organized religions support organ donation, considering it a generous act that is the individual’s choice. Learn more about religion and donation.

MYTH: I don’t need to tell my family that I’d like to be a donor, because it’s already written in my will.

TRUTH: By the time your will is read, it will be too late for you to be a donor. Telling your family now that you want to be an organ and tissue donor is the best way to help them understand your wishes and make certain they are honored.

MYTH: Minorities should refuse to donate because organ allocation discriminates by race.

TRUTH: Organs are matched by many factors including blood type, medical urgency and time on the waiting list. A patient’s age, gender, race, ethnicity or wealth does not affect who receives available organs. Minorities make up more than half of the people currently on the organ transplant waiting list, and patients are more likely to find matches among donors of their same race or ethnicity. This is why it is especially important for minorities to sign up to be organ donors. Learn more about minorities and organ donation.

MYTH: I can’t be a donor because of my age or health issues.

TRUTH: Anyone can decide to be a donor regardless of age or health. In fact, the oldest organ donor in the U.S. was 92.  Your ability to donate is determined at the time of death.

MYTH: Donation will interfere with plans for my funeral.

TRUTH: Donation should not interfere with customary funeral plans, including those with open-casket viewings. Doctors maintain dignity and respect for the donor at all times.

MYTH: Organs are sold, with enormous profits going to the medical community.

TRUTH: Federal law prohibits buying and selling organs in the United States. Violators are punishable by prison sentences and fines.

MYTH: The recipient will know who I am.

TRUTH: Information about the donor is released to the recipient only if the family of the donor requests or agrees to it. Otherwise, the strictest confidence of patient privacy is maintained for both donor families and recipients.

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Wellness Wednesday: Donate the Gift of Life

NDLM-2016_FacebookAd_with-WebsiteApril is National Donate Life Month. It’s a month to celebrate those who have received transplants, to recognize those who continue to wait, to honor donors and donor families and to thank registered donors for giving hope.

Currently, over 122,000 men, women and children are awaiting organ transplants in the U.S. About 58% of patients awaiting transplants are minorities. Sadly, 8,000 people die each year22 people each day—because the organs they need are not donated in time.


Another person is added to the nation’s organ transplant waiting list every 10 minutes.


Who can donate?

OrganDonorsPeople of all ages and medical histories can be potential donors. Transplantation is one of the most remarkable success stories in the history of medicine. It offers patients a new chance at healthy, productive and normal lives and returns them to their families, friends and communities.

The vast majority of Americans support organ donation. However, many people overlook the important step of registering as a donor. Donors are often people who died suddenly and unexpectedly. Their families are then faced with making the decision at a time of shock and grief. Registering now relieves your family of this burden.

More than 121 million people—approximately 51% of the U.S. adult population—are
registered organ, eye and tissue donors. Yet, the wait is still long for some patients. The average waiting time for a kidney from a deceased donor is 3 to 5 years.

Each year, approximately 30,000 people are registered as tissue donors and more than 1 million tissue transplants are performed; the surgical need for donated tissue is steadily rising. One tissue donor can help save more than 50 people.


It is estimated that nearly 30,000 patients began new lives in 2015 thanks to organ transplants (from 8,500 deceased and 6,000 living donors).


 

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