Doctors’ Day: Mercy Philadelphia Hospital Golden Stethoscope Awards

Mercy Philadelphia Hospital announced the winners of its Golden Stethoscope Awards today. The Golden Stethoscope Awards are colleague-voted awards given out annually at the Doctors’ Day Luncheon.

And the Golden Stethoscope goes to …

Golden Stethoscope on whiteBest Penmanship:

Priyanka T. Bhattacharya, MD, hospitalist

Friendliest:

Daniel J. Sung, MD, hospitalist

Best Bedside Manner:

David J. Addley, DO, cardiovascular disease

Quickest to Answer Beeper:

Daniel J. Sung, MD, hospitalist

Best Dressed:

Gerald L. DeVaughn, MD, cardiovascular disease

Funniest:

Ravindra C. Hallur, MD, hospitalist

Most Dedicated:

John B. Fobia, MD, general and vascular surgery (tie)
Sushma Kaveti, MD, hospitalist (tie)

Best Leader:

Kevin S. Fleming, MD, hospitalist

Hardest Worker:

Gul Madison, MD, infectious disease

Best Team Player:

Malgorzata E. Goralczyk, MD, radiology

Best Personality:

Arafat Hakim, MD, hospitalist

Congratulations to all of our winners! And thank you to all of our MPH physicians for their dedication and commitment to caring for our community!

Doctors’ Day: Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital Golden Stethoscope Awards

Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital announced the winners of its Golden Stethoscope Awards on Tuesday. The Golden Stethoscope Awards are colleague-voted awards given out annually at the Doctors’ Day Luncheon.

And the Golden Stethoscope goes to …

Golden Stethoscope on whiteBest Penmanship:

Richard A. Seifert, MD, cardiology

Friendliest:

James M. Minnella, MD, internal medicine

Best Bedside Manner:

Brad S. Bendesky, MD, emergency medicine

Quickest to Answer Beeper:

Judith T. Tran, MD, psychiatry

Best Dressed:

Manzoor A. Rather, MD, hospitalist

Funniest:

John Makopoulos, MD, emergency medicine

Most Dedicated:

Anthony S. Mazzeo, MD, emergency medicine

Best Leader:

Martin J. O’Riordan, MD, cardiovascular disease

Hardest Worker:

Prashanth R. Ramachandra, MD, bariatric and general surgery

Best Team Player:

Jayamohan V. Nair, MD, hospitalist

Best Personality:

Peter Correnti, DO, cardiovascular disease (tie)
Michael J. Korman, MD, pulmonary medicine (tie)

Congratulations to all of our winners! And thank you to all of our MFH physicians for their dedication and commitment to caring for our community!

Wellness Wednesday: Keeping Yourself Healthy

Two separate recent studies suggest that being married may improve the likelihood of surviving a heart attack and may also help you beat cancer.

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It is possible that the reason for this is that married folks have a significant other nagging … er, I mean strongly encouraging … them to go to the doctor on a regular basis and get a checkup.

Preventive care and early detection are key to maintaining and continuing a healthy lifestyle as you age. Finding cancers early, learning about diseases or conditions at an early stage, gives you a better chance of doing something about it.

The best way to proactively keep yourself healthy is to take care of your body. So whether you have a spouse to ‘encourage’ you or not, there are some steps you can take to get in shape and keep healthy.

Be physically active.

Walking briskly, mowing the lawn, playing team sports, and biking are just a few examples of how you can get moving. If you are not already physically active, start small and work up to 30 minutes a day of moderate physical activity for most days of the week.

Eat a healthy diet.

Concept, food, meal.

Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat dairy products are healthy choices. Lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, and nuts are good, too. Try to eat foods that are low in saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt and added sugars.

Stay at a healthy weight.

Try to balance the calories you take in with the calories you burn with your physical activities. As you age, eat fewer calories and increase your physical activity. This will prevent gradual weight gain over time.

Drink alcohol in moderation or not at all.

MenhealthCurrent dietary guidelines for Americans recommend that if you choose to drink alcoholic beverages, you do not exceed 2 drinks per day for men (1 drink per day for women). Some people should not drink alcoholic beverages at all, including

  • Individuals who cannot restrict their drinking to moderate levels.
  • Individuals who plan to drive, operate machinery, or take part in other activities that requires attention, skill, or coordination.
  • Individuals taking prescription or over-the-counter medications that can interact with alcohol.
  • Individuals with specific medical conditions.
  • Persons recovering from alcoholism.

Don’t smoke.

For more information on quitting, visit Quit Smoking section.

Take aspirin to avoid a heart attack.

If you are at risk for a heart attack (you’re over 45, smoke, or have diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or a family history of heart disease), check with your doctor and find out if taking aspirin is the right choice for you.

Sources: AHRQ, UC San Diego Health, British Cardiovascular Society


More information:

Man and Life: How Marriage, Race and Ethnicity and Birthplace Affect Cancer Survival

Marriage could improve heart attack survival and reduce hospital stay


Watch Mercy Dance to Support Men′s Health Month

Doctors’ Day: Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital Golden Stethoscope Awards

GoldenStethoscope-wpMercy Fitzgerald Hospital announced the winners of its Golden Stethoscope Awards today. The Golden Stethoscope Awards are colleague-voted awards given out annually at the Doctors’ Day Luncheon.

And the Golden Stethoscope goes to …

Best Penmanship:
Ronald Lutz, M.D., emergency medicine

Friendliest:
Wendy Gejer, M.D., emergency medicine

Best Bedside Manner:
Russell Yoon, M.D., emergency medicine

Quickest to Answer Beeper:
Bezareli Banadda, M.D., internal medicine

Best Dressed:
Ali Ahmadinejad, M.D., vascular surgery, general surgery

Funniest:
James McMaster, D.O., internal medicine

Most Dedicated:
Loc Van Tran, M.D., internal medicine

Best Leader:
Anthony Mazzeo, M.D., emergency medicine

Hardest Worker:
Felipe Suero, M.D., anesthesiology

Best Team Player:
Salmi Simmons, M.D., interventional radiology

Best Personality:
Martin O’Riordan, M.D., cardiovascular disease

Congratulations to all of our winners! And thank you to all of our MFH physicians for their dedication and commitment to caring for our community!

Doctors’ Day: Mercy Philadelphia Hospital Golden Stethoscope Awards

GoldenStethoscope-wpMercy Philadelphia Hospital announced the winners of its Golden Stethoscope Awards today. The Golden Stethoscope Awards are colleague-voted awards given out annually at the Doctors’ Day Luncheon.

And the Golden Stethoscope goes to …

Best Penmanship:
Priyanka T. Bhattacharya, M.D., hospitalist

Friendliest:
Sushma Kaveti, M.D., hospitalist

Best Bedside Manner:
Daniel Sung, M.D., hospitalist

Quickest to Answer Beeper:
James McMaster, D.O., internal medicine

Best Dressed:
John Fobia, M.D., vascular surgery, general surgery

Funniest:
Michael Korman, M.D., pulmonary medicine

Most Dedicated:
Fatima Babar, M.D., hospitalist, geriatric medicine

Best Leader:
Ravindra C. Hallur, M.D., neurological surgery

Hardest Worker:
Rotem Friede, M.D., critical care medicine, intensivist

Best Team Player:
Allen Kagan, M.D., hospitalist

Best Personality:
David Addley, D.O., cardiovascular disease

Congratulations to all of our winners! And thank you to all of our MPH physicians for their dedication and commitment to caring for our community!

Wellness Wednesday: Tips for Those Living with Stress

stress_ballEveryone experiences feelings of worry, unhappiness or grief now and then. But when changes in mood interrupt one’s ability to perform daily responsibilities and enjoy life, chronic stress may be the reason.

According to The American Institute of Stress, there are numerous emotional and physical disorders that have been linked to stress including depression, anxiety, heart attacks, stroke, hypertension, increased susceptibility to infections as well as autoimmune diseases.

Although everyone experiences symptoms of stress differently, there are common signs. If symptoms like these, or others, persist, it may be time to seek help:

  • Excess anxiety, worry, guilt, nervousness
  • Depression, frequent or wild mood swings
  • Increased anger, frustration, hostility
  • Forgetfulness, disorganization, confusion
  • Heartburn, stomach pain, nausea
  • Feelings of loneliness or worthlessness
  • Excessive gambling or impulse buying
  • Increased smoking, alcohol or drug use

The National Institutes of Health offers the following tips for managing stress:

  • Physical activity. Start a physical activity program. Most experts recommend 20 minutes of aerobic activity three times per week.
  • Nutrition. Eat foods that improve your health and well-being. For example, increase the amount of fruits and vegetables you eat. Avoid the use of alcohol as a coping strategy.
  • Social support. Make an effort to socialize. Even though you may feel tempted to avoid people when you feel stressed, meeting friends usually helps people feel less stressed. Be good to yourself and others. Avoid the use of alcohol as a coping strategy.
  • Relaxation. Learn about and try using relaxation techniques, such as guided imagery, listening to music, or practicing yoga or meditation. With some practice, these techniques should work for you.

You can make an appointment with your Primary Care Physician (PCP) who may refer you to a specialist, if needed. If you don’t have a PCP, just visit your insurance carrier’s website, look for the “find a doctor” area and follow the instructions.

When you’re living with any disease or condition, it may not always be easy to decide where to go for care. However, if you (or a loved one) are in crisis, it’s best to go to the emergency room.

For less severe matters that still require immediate attention, if you can’t get in to see your PCP, going to an urgent care facility can save you time and money.

Even if you require emergency or urgent care for your health situation, it’s always best to have a relationship with a PCP who knows your history and understands what is happening with your health over time.

To find a Mercy Health System physician, go to www.mercyhealth.org/find-a-doctor.